VERY IMPORTANT: How to Teach “Look at me” , and the Training Bubble Explained

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Eye contact is an important brick in the structure of authentic dog training. Pet dogs are one of the few varieties that normally check out human beings in the eyes to communicate with them. Given that dogs do this naturally, it's a very easy action to teach them to look at us when we inquire to! This video clip shows you SPECIFICALLY how to do just that!

Allow me understand if you like it:-RRB-.

Zak George.

An introduction to remote control training:.

36 Comments on “VERY IMPORTANT: How to Teach “Look at me” , and the Training Bubble Explained”

    1. Rachel Barclay it’s okay, but remember if you do not slowly fade into not reinforcing every time the dog may lose its training to look at you in the eyes for its name. So most anytime you say it’s name, you should plan on whether or not your response was reinforcing enough to keep as a reliable command. If you forget to reinforce too many times the command will lose its power. I think it’s more at risk to extinction due to our human forgetfulness 🙂

  1. I’m glad you showed that young kid learning it. Adults tend to not engage while people are watching. This kid showed the learning process.

  2. Initially you shouldn’t use a command at all… Just the lure then the clicker… 

    You lure with food… to eye contact and click when he gets it… Then food…
    Thats it…

    Add the command later only when he internalises the physical actions 100%…

    Commands should always come later… Dog’s respond better to body language… when they get the physical cue… You add a command, with the physical cue… and then you slowly start decreasing the physical cue until they respond just to the command stimulus…

    The problem with starting with command immediately is that they can easily be confused… you may say look at me… at a point in time… the dog doesnt look at that point in time… so he may ascociate something else with the look at me command…

    You want to lure the dog into behaviours with the food… click to mark the behaviour when he gets it right…  When you get this interaction add commands later…

    Think about it like this… The dog wants to eat the treat… so he naturally follows it with his eyes… you say look at me… 
    thats just background noise to him… he isnt associating immediately.. because he hasnt really learned the command…

    The dog needs to hear the clicker that he did it right… When you mark the behaviours based on the physical action of luring the dog with food… He gets it… He is waiting for the click… So when it happens he knows he will get rewarded…

    You can only add the command with the lure when he GETS IT…. If you add too soon… you may say look at me… and he looks away… suddenly he associates look at me with something else… Training takes longer… And sometimes behaviours are not understood.

    You need to set up the dog for success.  You do this by rewarding wanted behaviours that you incentivise him to enact… 
    You only tell the dog what to do when you can guarantee success…
    You want to condition 100% successful behaviours to verbal stimuli..

    Zack confirms most of what I said at the start of his video and within the video in a few sentences… However he then goes to coach the exact opposite to his clients in this video…
    The dogs in those training sessions are not ready to apply the look/watchme verbal command… They seem to be working this for the first time… Yet are coached to tell the dog the verbal command.

    1. Clorox Bleach and Windex Again, trigger is a word commonly misused. And no, just trying to educate. Trolls are dumb, though. 😉

  3. That little boy with the glasses in this video training his dog is adorable! I’m learning my dog this today (look at me command). helpful video to watch before getting down to business later :3

    1. RAPOSAfox then you do not click until the dogs eyes look at your eyes. You can also hold the treat out to the side, then say watch me and if the dogs head turns towards you immediately click and treat.

  4. My little dog is nine years old now. He would rather play with his toy than bring it to me. What’s the best way to teach him to return the toy to me, so that we can play fetch? Thank you.—–And thank you for teaching me about “watch me.” Terrific lesson.

    1. The come command is going to be your biggest emphasis. Once you can recall your dog just do that after he grabs it and he will bring it right back. At that point you will need to teach him/her out, drop, leave etc.

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